About Us

The Greater Toronto Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC-GTC) is Southern Ontario’s leading authority on green building best practices.

With an ever-growing member network of over 6,000 building industry professionals, the GTC is dedicated to creating a cleaner, healthier, high-performance built environment though education, collaboration and innovation.  We work with both government and private enterprise to accelerate the adoption of green building principles, policies, standards and tools.  The GTC is the primary organization responsible for the facilitation and delivery of LEED workshops in Southern Ontario and provides a wide range of educational and networking events for our members and the green building community at large.

Our mission guides our work
Lead and accelerate the transformation to high-performing, healthy green buildings, homes and communities throughout Canada.

Our Vision
A transformed built environment leading to a sustainable future.

Canada Green Building Council

Established in 2002, the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) is a non-profit national organization dedicated to working with government and the private sector to accelerate the "mainstream adoption of green building principles, policies, practices, standards and tools." In collaboration with the national organization, the Greater Toronto Chapter acts as a catalyst for green building development across the Greater Golden Horseshoe region of Ontario.
 

Why Green Building?

Buildings have a dramatic impact on our environment. Not only do they consume vast amounts of our natural resources, they also contribute highly to climate change. Our building industry consumes:

  • 40% of the world’s materials and energy 1
  • 35% of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions
  • 33% of Canada’s energy consumption
  • 50% of Canada’s natural resources consumption
  • 12% of Canada’s non-industrial water use
  • 35% of Canada’s waste going to landfill 
By building green, we can greatly reduce these environmental impacts. Green buildings differ from conventional buildings by integrating environmental and social initiatives that result in a reduction of their environmental impact while improving  building performance and providing healthier interiors for occupants.

Sources:
1: D.M. Roodman and N. Lenssen, A Building Revolution: How Ecology and Health Concerns are Transforming Construction, Worldwatch Paper 124, Worldwatch Institute, March 1995, http://www.worldwatch.org/node/866